Local Survivors and Experts

Holocaust survivors and children of Holocaust survivors may be available to present their stories to tour groups both at the Museum and at off campus presentations. Because they are volunteers, we cannot guarantee that a speaker will be available for your tour. To schedule a tour at the Museum, please complete our Tour Request Form. If you would like an off campus tour please fill out the following form: Off Campus Visit Form.

 

Anna Weisz Rado

Anna Weisz Rado

Anna Weisz Rado

Anna Rado was born in Rajka, Hungary that is a small town near the border of what was then Czechoslovakia.   Her family consisted of her parents and a brother and sister. Anna’s father owned two butcher shops—one kosher and one non-kosher.  On March 10, 1944, the Nazis marched into Hungary and changed Anna’s life forever.

Anna was first sent to live in a ghetto and from there the family was deported by train to Auschwitz. When they arrived at the concentration camp, her parents were separated from her and her sister.  It was the last time she saw them alive. Anna was taken from Auschwitz to work in a factory in Gebhardsdorf, Germany which seemed like paradise compared to life in Auschwitz and then to a munitions factory in Georgenthal.  She was liberated by Russian troops when she was 14 years old.

Anna and her family, along with her brother and his family, came to live in San Antonio, Texas in 1957 where they were reunited with their sister Suzanne Jalnos who is also a Holocaust survivor.

Rose Sherman Williams

Rose Sherman Williams

Rose Sherman Williams

Rose Williams was born in Radom, Poland. She and her 3 siblings, a younger sister and brother and an older brother along with her parents, had a lovely life in Radom. Her father owned a leather factory. When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Rose’s life as a twelve year old was changed forever.

The Sherman family was forced to move out of their home and move into a ghetto. There the entire family lived in one room. In 1942, the ghetto was liquidated and Rose was separated from her family and sent to another town in Poland where she worked in an ammunition factory. During this time she learned that her parents perished. From there she was sent to Auschwitz where she received her tattoo. Life in Auschwitz was extremely hard for Rose. Because she had no shoes, her feet became frostbitten and full of sores. However, it was also in Auschwitz where she was reunited with her sister, Binne. Towards the end of the war, she was forced to march to Bergen-Belsen, the worst camp that Rose had witnessed. On April 15, 1945 she was liberated by British troops.

After liberation, she worked in Stuttgart, Germany until arriving in the United States.